Lobster Bisque with Ice Wine Recipe

From Dorothy McNett's Recipe Book.

| Browse by Category | Browse alphabetically | Cooking Club |
Google
 
Web dorothymcnett.com

See Also: Class Favorites · Cooking Club · Fish and Seafood · Soups · Television Show Recipes

Lobster Bisque with Ice Wine

From Dorothy McNett's recipes at www.dorothymcnett.com.

2-3 cooked lobster tails (or use 1 pound of frozen lobster meat defrosted)
lobster shells (if you don't have those, use prawn shells)
2 1/2 cups seafood stock, or chicken or vegetable stock
1 medium onion, sliced
4 ribs celery, cut into chunks
1 bay leaf
2-3 whole cloves
6-10 whole peppercorns
1/3 cup unsalted butter
1/3 cup all purpose unbleached flour
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground peppercorns, or to taste
1/2 cup ale
2 cups whole milk
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 cup heavy cream
sherry or ice wine for a serving garnish, if desired

Of course it is best if you have a wonderful fresh lobster to boil. If not, use 2 frozen lobster tails, removing the meat and reserving the shells for the broth. If those are not available, use some frozen cooked lobster meat. To make a flavorful stock, it is best to use the lobster shells or substitute large prawn or crawdad shells. If you do not have any shells, make this bisque anyway with just the lobster as it will still be very delicious.
Remove the meat from the cooked lobsters and dice it. Set aside. Slightly crush the shells and put them in a large saucepan with the stock, onion, celery, bay leaf, cloves and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer, and cook gently for 30 minutes. Strain it through a sieve and discard the solids, keeping the flavorful stock. In a batter bowl, melt the butter 30 seconds in microwave. Whisk in flour, salt, and pepper. Gradually whisk in the ale, milk and nutmeg. Carefully blend this into the stock mixture and cook and stir several minutes to cook the flour and to thicken the mixture a bit. Now blend in the cream and diced lobster. Heat gently 2-3 minutes, do not let it boil. Taste and correct seasonings, adding more salt or pepper as needed. Some people like to float a little sherry over the top when serving. In Nova Scotia a local ice wine is generally used.

Recipe created 2003-11-11.

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional

© 1996-2013 Dorothy McNett. All Rights Reserved.